Event Calendar

2017 Solar Eclipse

Summary

Date/Time: August 21, 2017 1:00pm–1:30pm
Location: Midstate Fountain-Pavilion
Category: Events

2017 Solar Eclipse

2017 Solar Eclipse - August 21 
1:17 PM - Fountain/Pavilion
 
Join Midstate College on August 21st, from 1:00PM to 1:20PM by the fountain and pavilion area to celebrate this rare occurrence. We will be giving away solar viewing glasses to the first 50 people to join us and have refreshments available.  The Cafe specials for the day will also be Moon Pies and Sun Chips.  Peoria will view a 93.08% total coverage of the Sun.  Just remember as a safety precaution do not look at the Sun without solar viewing glasses as it can cause permanent eye damage or blindness.  The full strength of the Sun is still there even if you can't see it at the time.  Click here for details on the eclipse.   
Big Deal or Not?  
by Jane Bradbury If you've mastered the English language, it's not too difficult to comprehend what the term solar (sun) eclipse (obscure or conceal) means. NASA.gov defines it quite simply as when "the moon gets in the way of the sun's light and casts its shadow on Earth." But, is an eclipse a big deal? It really comes down to how often it happens and for how long.
 
According to NASA, every year or two an eclipse happens somewhere on Earth and a partial eclipse occurs somewhere even more frequently. Each eclipse, however, is only happening across a section of the Earth. Think back to those middle school demonstrations with a lamp, a globe, and a small ball. Someone turned the globe as they orbited around the lamp (sun) while another student orbited the ball (moon) around the globe (Earth). Each time the ball's position would block the lamp's light and cast a shadow on the globe, it was only over a small section. Still eclipses happen somewhere on earth almost yearly.
 
How often, however, does a total eclipse occurs at any given place on earth? Unlike the simple demonstrations from middle school, actually trying to calculate (even roughly guess) the frequency of an eclipse at a particular point is mind boggling to this librarian. There's the tilt of the Earth, the shape of the orbits... and it's time to return to NASA.gov.
 
"Getting a chance to see a total solar eclipse is rare. The moon's shadow on Earth isn't very big, so only a small portion of places on Earth will see it. You have to be on the sunny side of the planet when it happens. You also have to be in the path of the moon's shadow. On average, the same spot on Earth only gets to see a solar eclipse for a few minutes about every 375 years!"
 
On August 21st a total eclipse will slash a path across the United States. This is rare! This is a big deal!
 
For more information and to prepare for the occasion follow these links:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBN3jheTBG0 
https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/eclipses/en/ 
https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/webinars 
https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-who-what-where-when-and-how